SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE​

In tumour therapy, immunogenic cell death (ICD) is an important piece to produce a cytotoxic, tumour-specific immune reaction against the tumour cells and the tumour growth. This reaction can keep the tumour from growing.

 

80 centres around the world take part in the united guidelines for definition, detection and interpretation of immunogenic cell death. The team at the IOZK supports this with contributions to oncolytic virotherapy and loco-regional modulate electro-hyperthermia.​

The tumour as a dynamic process​

ICD - Inducing immunogenic cell death​

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Nowadays, basic research knows many forms of cell death.
One form of cell death can trigger an immune reaction against the structures of dead cells, this is immunogenic cell death.

 

The last 30 years have shown that we can use and manipulate the immune system to target cancer cells. Nowadays there are active anti-tumour substances and treatments that lead to an immunostimulation - for example a virus that can infect and destroy a cancer cell. In time we have discovered that besides this oncolytic activity of the virus, the immunization, which is produced by the death of the tumour cells, is just as important. This is the process called immunogenic cell death (ICD).

 

The particular importance of immunogenic cell death is known, but in reality it happens very rarely. When a cell in the body dies, the immune system usually does not care for it, and this is good, because otherwise our body would explode within a minute from the immune system reacting to each dying cell. In contrast, in the case of immunogenic cell death the immune system is alarmed and reacts by triggering an immune response. An anti-tumour strategy therefore consists in inducing immunogenic cell death by infecting the tumour cells with an oncolytic virus.

Consensus guidelines for the definition, detection and interpretation of immunogenic cell death

 

Lorenzo Galluzzi, Ilio Vitale, Sarah Warren, Sandy Adjemian, Patrizia Agostinis, Aitziber Buqué Martinez, Timothy A Chan, George Coukos, Sandra Demaria, Eric Deutsch, Dobrin Draganov, Richard L Edelson, Silvia C Formenti, Jitka Fucikova, Lucia Gabriele, Udo S Gaipl, Sofia R Gameiro, Abhishek D Garg, Encouse Golden, Jian Han, Kevin J Harrington, Akseli Hemminki, James W Hodge, Dewan Md Sakib Hossain, Tim Illidge, Michael Karin, Howard L Kaufman, Oliver Kepp,Guido Kroemer, Juan Jose Lasarte, Sherene Loi, Michael T Lotze, Gwenola Manic, Taha Merghoub, Alan A Melcher, Karen L Mossman, Felipe Prosper, Oystein Rekdal, Maria Rescigno, Chiara Riganti, Antonella Sistigu, Mark J Smyth, Radek Spisek, John Stagg, Bryan E Strauss, Daolin Tang, Kazuki Tatsuno, Stefaan van Gool, Peter Vandenabeele, Takahiro Yamazaki, Dmitriy Zamarin, Laurence Zitvogel, Alessandra Cesano, Francesco Marincola

 

13.01.2020 – Journal for ImmunoTherapy of Cancer (BMJ)

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SCIENTIFIC DISCOURSE​

The tumour as

a dynamic process​

In tumour therapy, immunogenic cell death (ICD) is an important piece to produce a cytotoxic, tumour-specific immune reaction against the tumour cells and the tumour growth. This reaction can keep the tumour from growing.

 

80 centres around the world take part in the united guidelines for definition, detection and interpretation of immunogenic cell death. The team at the IOZK supports this with contributions to oncolytic virotherapy and loco-regional modulate electro-hyperthermia.​

Inducing immunogenic cell death​

Nowadays, basic research knows many forms of cell death. One form of cell death can trigger an immune reaction against the structures of dead cells, this is immunogenic cell death.

 

The last 30 years have shown that we can use and manipulate the immune system to target cancer cells. Nowadays there are active anti-tumour substances and treatments that lead to an immunostimulation – for example a virus that can infect and destroy a cancer cell. In time we have discovered that besides this oncolytic activity of the virus, the immunization, which is produced by the death of the tumour cells, is just as important. This is the process called immunogenic cell death (ICD).

 

The particular importance of immunogenic cell death is known, but in reality it happens very rarely. When a cell in the body dies, the immune system usually does not care for it, and this is good, because otherwise our body would explode within a minute from the immune system reacting to each dying cell. In contrast, in the case of immunogenic cell death the immune system is alarmed and reacts by triggering an immune response. An anti-tumour strategy therefore consists in inducing immunogenic cell death by infecting the tumour cells with an oncolytic virus.

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